Medtronic Releases Results from One-Year Insulin Pump Study

July 12, 2018  Source: Drug Delivery Business 160

On Tuesday the analysis results of a yearlong comparative study of hospital admission rates between diabetes patients using insulin pumps and those taking multiple daily injections of insulin were released by Medtronic (NYSE: MDT) and UnitedHealthcare (NYSE: UNH).

The study involved 6000 individuals including people using Medtronic’s MiniMed 630G system, and previous iterations of the company’s insulin pumps.

Diabetics using insulin pumps had 27% less preventable hospital admissions compared to those using multiple daily injections of insulin, announced the two companies.

“These results show that patients with diabetes can benefit from using insulin pumps and comprehensive support services, thereby increasing the quality of the care they receive and reducing hospital admissions as well as costs,” Dr. Peter Pronovost, CMO at UnitedHealthcare, said. “The first-year results are encouraging, and we will monitor patients using Medtronic pump therapies to ensure we continue to see improved quality of care, fewer hospitalizations, and lower costs.”

Hooman Hakami, EVP & president of Medtronic’s diabetes group remarked, “These positive results provide further evidence of the benefits of both automated insulin delivery and of value-based healthcare models. Through this unique partnership, Medtronic and UnitedHealthcare have demonstrated a commitment by both organizations to prioritize innovation that improves health outcomes and lowers healthcare costs.”

UnitedHealthcare members with diabetes received access to Medtronic’s insulin delivery devices after the two companies signed a deal in 2016. The results presented from the current study include data on measurements taken from July 2016 to June 2017. MiniMed 670G, Medtronic’s latest insulin pump was launched at the conclusion of the study period and data from people using that system will be incorporated in later analyses, as reported by Medtronic.

By Ddu
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