Three Misconceptions and Four Suggestions to Pay Attention to in Foreign Trade

May 4, 2018  Source: Ddu 708

Foreign trade is a highly competitive field with numerous potholes and hidden issues. As a leader in the online pharmaceutical and medical device B2B industry, Ddu staff have in-depth knowledge of these matters. Today we’ll share our take on three misconceptions that are often overlooked and four important suggestions on how to approach your clients.

Three misconceptions

1.Price and quality are the only things that matter when choosing suppliers.
Prices are set by the company and since it isn’t possible to change it arbitrarily, we should know our products and their price trends like the back of our hands. In this way, you can have a card up your sleeve during business negotiations. As for quality, we recommended using experimental data to prove the quality of your products, especially with third-party authority certificates.

2.You’re just selling the product and don’t need to know it in-depth.
The most important part of any job, is knowing your product well. Knowing your product’s features in-and-out, plays a major role in building trust between you and your client. It is far more impressive when you are able to inform your client of all the features your product possesses, rather than simply sending the quotations and specifications. Not only does this prove your professionalism, but it also allows clients to learn more about the product they will end up selling.

3.Your client doesn’t have to like you, just your product.
Your customer service and professionalism determines whether your client will be interested in your services and in building a long-lasting professional relationship with you.

Four suggestions

1. If the lowest price you offer for the lowest quality product, still exceeds the client’s target price, it’s safe to say that no further negotiations are necessary and that you can move on to the next client.

2.If a client places an urgent order and is solely concerned about the price of your product, it is more than likely that they are not interested in brand-loyalty and will easily move on if they find a supplier with better prices.

3.Build trust and understanding before you ask for the amount of orders. Giving comes before receiving, so offer the information you have and create healthy and clear communication from the onset of your business relationship.

4. Never undervalue clients who place small orders. Every client is important and you never know what the future offers. If your clients are willing to trust you with a little, they will be willing to trust you with much more when the time comes.

By Ddu
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